Texas Judge strikes down ban on same sex marriage

by EDWARD PINTO Section Editor 

The ban on same-sex in Texas was finally struck down on Wednesday, February 25 by a federal judge. This is a huge step in mainly conservative state that is somewhat opposed to it.

However, the strike down of the ban will not let gay and lesbian couples get married straight away. This decision has sparked interest in other mainly conservative states such as Utah, Kentucky, and Oklahoma. Texas has banned same-sex marriage three times in 1997, 2003, and 2005.  Texas’s approval rating for gay marriage is well below the national average as 76 percent of the votes have been against it.

Same-sex marriage is not a new problem in the United States as many other states have gone through court to make sure it became legal. Popular states such as California, New York, New Jersey allow same-sex marriage. Although many people have supported gay marriage with protests and rallies, other people are still unsure about it.

“I personally don’t have anything against and I don’t know why people have a problem with it. I support it 100% and other people should seriously consider it,” said sophomore Andy Park.

The states in general are allowed to regulate marriages, which is what Texas argued. According to their rules and regulations, a traditional marriage is only between one man and one woman. Other opponents of same-sex marriage are angry about the fact that Texas, which is probably the most conservative state in the country, dropped the ban on same-sex marriage as that will make their case a lot weaker than what it already is.

Same-sex couples have been fighting for a marriage license in Texas for the longest time, and plan to keep fighting for other states, as well. People who are opposed to gay marriage claim that children are harmed by growing up with gay couples, but usually that is not the case. It also would not affect any heterosexual couples because it really would not “be any of their business.”

“I have actually met a same-sex couple before in Florida when I was on vacation there. They were really nice and didn’t treat us any different as we didn’t either. I have no opinion on it, but it wouldn’t really bother me that much,” said freshmen Jarod Rodgers.

Other states that are now waiting to hear from their appeals. That will put judges in other states in a dilemma and on the spot to strike down similar bans.

In 2011, only five states allowed same-sex marriage and now in 2014, 17 states, including the District of Colombia, allow it. Almost everyone in the United States has some say in same-sex marriage and when that vote comes around to allow it or not, hopefully many citizens will come together to drop the ban on gay marriages.

What do you think of same-sex marriage? Do you think it should be allowed with no question or if it should be banned almost virtually anywhere?

#EdwardPinto #gaymarriage #Homosexuality #Texas

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